Conflict Minerals Regulation In politically unstable areas, armed groups often use forced labour to mine minerals. determining whether conflict minerals originated in the covered countries: under the final rule, a company that uses a conflict mineral is required to conduct a reasonable country of origin inquiry that must be performed in good faith and be reasonably designed to determine whether the conflict mineral originated in the covered countries or are in the covered countries; and (ii) whether the minerals directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups in the covered countries. We implemented a supplier engagement approach. Exotica Valves' Conflict Minerals Policy. Our third-party consultant also applied quality assurance measures in . The Conflict-Free Smelter (CFS) Program is a program developed by EICC and GeSI to enhance an organization's capability to verify the responsible sourcing of materials. 3 The SEC rules define conflict minerals as 3TG metals, wherever extracted. The Securities and Exchange Commission requires companies to report on the origin of these "conflict minerals" used in their products. the Conflict Minerals - cassiterite (tin), columbite-tantalite (tantalum), gold and wolframite (tungsten) - that may be necessary for the functionality or production of products that Wolverine manufactures or contracts to manufacture. " Conflict minerals " means tin (cassiterite), tungsten (wolframite), tantalum (columbite tantalite or coltan), gold, or their derivatives, which originate in the covered countries. The Home Depot provides a Supplier AlertLine for the exclusive use of suppliers to report violations of company policies, including the Conflict Minerals Policy. Although some companies noted that guidance the SEC staff revised in 2017 had caused uncertainty about the filing process, most filings were similar to those submitted in prior years. drc conflict undeterminable for a temporary two-year period (or four-year period for smaller reporting companies), if the company is unable to determine whether the minerals in its products originated in the covered countries or financed or benefited armed groups in those countries, then those products are considered "drc conflict Where applicable, the Company has As required by the Rule, the Company undertook an assessment to determine which of its products contained a Conflict Mineral due to the presence of minerals obtained from suppliers or from the . Covered Country - As defined by the Dodd-Frank Act, this includes the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania . certain conflict minerals and their derivatives, including tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold ("Conflict Minerals"), sourced from the Democratic Republic of the Congo ("DRC") or adjoining countries ("Covered Countries"). For over a decade, the trade in conflict minerals has fueled human rights abuses and promoted insecurity in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Covered countries are defined in Section 1502 as having an internationally recognized border with DRC and include Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act requires Securities and Exchange Commission issuers to file conflict minerals disclosures (CMD) that indicate whether their product(s) contain tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold that originate from the Democratic Republic of Congo and its nine neighboring countries (collectively referred to as "covered countries").

It is expected that the Conflict Minerals Rules will reduce a significant source of funding for armed groups that are committing human rights abuses in the DRC and the other Covered Countries."Conflict Minerals" include gold, columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite, and wolframite, as well as their derivatives, tantalum, tin, and tungsten. For questions and further information, please contact: AFAB Precision Machining. In certain circumstances, this . We found just one a tin smelter in Rwanda from one of the Dodd-Frank Act's Covered Countries. The Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, passed by the US Congress in July 2010, includes a provision - section 1502 - aimed at stopping the national army and rebel groups in the DRC from illegally using profits . For a temporary 2-year period, or 4-year period for smaller reporting companies, if a company is unable to determine whether the minerals in its products originated from a covered country or were used to finance or benefit armed groups in the covered countries, the company may determine that its products are "DRC Conflict Undeterminable." 20742 Linear Lane. Wolverine must disclose whether the aforementioned Conflict Minerals originate from a Covered Country and, if . Additional Due Diligence Efforts:

Covered minerals The minerals go by the name of 3TG, an abbreviation for Tin, Tantalum, Tungsten and Gold, and are used in many manufactured goods across many industries, including the aerospace, appliances, automotive, electronics, jewelry, medical and tool and die industries. Mexico: 001-888 .

Not buying products and materials containing Conflict Minerals directly from Conflict Mines (CAHRA's and the Covered Countries) . As directed by Congress, the Commission developed rules which require covered issuers to conduct a "reasonable country of origin inquiry" regarding their conflict minerals. . conducted a good faith, reasonable country of origin inquiry ("RCOI") regarding such necessary Conflict Minerals. Conflict minerals are obtained from sources worldwide, and the Company does not desire to eliminate those originating in Covered Countries. (the "Covered Countries"), and is not from recycled or scrap sources, the registrant must exercise due diligence on the Countries or come from recycled or scrap sources, or that such conflict minerals did not directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups in the Covered Countries. For the purposes of the rule, conflict minerals include tantalum, tin, gold or tungsten. The "Conflict Minerals" for purposes of the Conflict Minerals Rules are gold, columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite, and wolframite (including their derivatives, tantalum, tin and tungsten) and any other minerals designated by the U.S. Secretary of State in the future. regarding the conflict minerals included in the products during the Reporting Period, which the Company refers to as the "Subject Minerals," to determine whether any such Subject Minerals originated in the Covered Countries and/ or whether any of the Subject Minerals were from recycled or scrap sources. This document constitutes Merck & Co., Inc.'s Conflict Minerals Report (the "Report" or "CMR") for the . the "Covered Countries"), or are from recycled or scrap sources. It is expected that the Conflict Minerals Rules will reduce a significant source of funding for armed groups that are committing human rights abuses in the DRC and the other Covered Countries.

"Covered Countries" are defined in the Rule as the Democratic Republic of Congo or any of its adjoining countries. But a new US law designed to help the region escape its . None were located in the European Union's list of CAHRAs (Conflict-Affected and High Risk Areas). In July 2010, the United States Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act"). Armed groups in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and adjoining countries reportedly exploit the minerals tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold to finance conflict in the region. Covered Countries and did not come from . Conflict Minerals Disclosure. We are committed to ensuring that any conflict minerals necessary to the functionality or production of our products are sourced from sources that do not fund armed conflict in the Covered Countries. Conflict Minerals Data Exchange Standard 1 SCOPE This standard establishes the requirements for exchanging conict minerals data between suppliers and their customers. , and smuggling of Conflict Minerals to countries beyond the Covered Countries. For example, tin extracted in Canada, Russia or Argentina is considered a conflict mineral by definition.

Conflict Minerals that are directly or indirectly financing or benefiting armed groups, we encourage suppliers to comply with our Conflict Minerals Policy. The rules and regulations require us to determine the extent to which our products contain Conflict Minerals originating from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and certain adjoining countries ("Covered Countries") by analyzing the products we manufacture and the raw materials and components we purchasethrough supply chain due . Conflict minerals are minerals mined in conditions of armed conflict and human rights abuses, and which are sold or traded by armed groups. Forward-Looking Statements Surmodics develops, manufactures and markets surface modification and in vitro diagnostic technologies and products to the healthcare industry. Conflict minerals are defined by the SEC as columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite, gold, wolframite, or their derivatives, which are limited to tantalum, tin, gold and tungsten regardless of whether these minerals finance conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo ("DRC") or adjoining countries. . InterFET Corporation is, by rule, required to make a reasonable country of origin inquiry (RCOI) to determine whether the issuer (InterFET Corporation) knows or has reason to believe that the conflict minerals may have originated in the DRC or an adjoining country (the covered country). 2018 - 2020. The Conflict Minerals Rule is intended to reduce a significant source of funding for armed groups that are committing human rights abuses in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (the "DRC") and is focused on specific minerals sourced from the DRC and its adjoining countries (Angola; Burundi; Central African Republic; the Republic of . Conflict resources are natural resources extracted in a conflict zone and sold to perpetuate the fighting. Conflict Minerals Sourcing Policy. To the extent that "conflict minerals" are necessary to the functionality or production of products that Weinschel Associates manufactures or contracts to manufacture, we are required to conduct supply chain diligence to determine whether the conflict minerals originated in the DRC or one of the other covered countries. Conflict Minerals are defined as cassiterite, columbite-tantalite, wolframite and gold, including their derivatives, which are limited to tin, tantalum and tungsten (3TG). They then sell those minerals to fund their activities, for example to buy weapons. Section 1502 on conflict minerals of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act is a transparency measure, and one part of a comprehensive approach to Congo's challenges. not sourcing from the Covered Countries, or whose conflict minerals policies indicated that they intend not to source from the Covered Countries at . Section 13 (p) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 13p-1 thereunder (collectively, the "conflict mineral rules") require certain disclosures concerning supply sources for conflict minerals -consisting of gold, tin, tungsten, or tantalum - that may be necessary to the manufacture or functionality of a company's products. An estimated 35 percent reported using conflict minerals from covered countries or from scrap or recycled sources. This RCOI was reasonably designed to determine whether the Conflict Minerals originated in the Covered Countries and whether the Conflict Minerals came from recycled or scrap sources. In the U.S., the standard deadline for reporting is May 31, but this may differ for some industries and other global conflict mineral . We recognize and support the need to develop programs which allow for improved transparency in 3T&G mining and transport of Conflict Minerals and improved traceability within the 3T&G supply . The information in this report includes the products of Honeywell International Inc. and its subsidiaries (Honeywell) as of .

. In the SEC rule, "DRC conflict-free" is defined as minerals that were extracted and did not directly or indirectly benefit armed groups in the covered countries. Our conflict minerals due diligence framework has been designed to be in line with the steps of the OECD Guidance, as applicable for downstream companies (as the term is defined in the The nature of conflict is ever-changing, while some conflicts may be country-wide, many conflict-related and high-risk incidents The RMI encourages responsible sourcing from conflict affected and high risk areas (CAHRAs). Twelve suppliers indicated sources in the covered countries or were unknown. 1) The term "conflict mineral" is defined by U.S. law in Section 1502 (e) (4) of the The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act ( i.e., the Act) as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the . Henkel undertakes due diligence to attempt to determine if use of any of the "conflict minerals" in our products directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups. Each county may have a high, medium, or low risk status based on the potential for the country to have sourced minerals from the Covered Countries in Africa. The rule imposes reporting requirements on certain companies to perform due diligence with respect to the sourcing of conflict minerals and to file annual reports relating to the use of conflict minerals (tantalum, tin, gold or tungsten) originating in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and certain adjoining countries ("Covered Countries") in . To meet the needs of a broad range of users, this standard provides exibility in the scope of the products covered within a single declaration.

Henkel undertakes due diligence to attempt to determine if use of any of the "conflict minerals" in our products directly or indirectly finance or benefit armed groups. For questions and further information, please contact: AFAB Precision Machining 20742 Linear Lane Lake Forest, CA 92630 (949) 457-9790 On August 22, 2012, the final rule regarding sourcing of conflict minerals under Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act ("the Dodd-Frank Act") was approved by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). Specifically, companies must determine whether: (i) any "conflict minerals" that are necessary to the functionality or production of a product originated . Federal law defines "conflict minerals" as (i) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore . On December 17, 2020 pursuant to Article 14.2 of the European Union Conflict Minerals Regulation 2017/821 the European . Covered Country - The Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. Congo (the "DRC") and its adjoining countries (the "Covered Countries"). The SEC did not issue any re-formulation of the US conflict minerals rule. It is expected that the Conflict Minerals Rules will reduce a significant source of funding for armed groups that are committing human rights abuses in the DRC and the other Covered Countries."Conflict Minerals" include gold, columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite, and wolframite, as well as their derivatives, tantalum, tin, and tungsten. The extraction and trade in these Conflict Minerals contribute financially to the ongoing violence in the region. Conflict Minerals that are directly or indirectly financing or benefiting armed groups, we encourage suppliers to comply with our Conflict Minerals Policy. Like many other companies tracing Conflict Minerals, it will take time for a company of our size and complexity to collect the information needed for us to fully understand our use of Conflict Minerals and .

Covered Country - As defined by the Dodd-Frank Act, this includes the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania . EU Regulation on Conflict Minerals differentiates upstream and downstream companies and expects compliance at different . Plexus supports the goal of ending violence, human rights violations and . Schlumberger recognizes that there are serious human rights abuses associated with the extraction, transportation and trade in minerals in the covered countries. Four common conflict minerals, clockwise from top left: coltan, cassiterite, gold ore, and wolframite. Conflict Minerals Policy InterFET Corporation policy is to comply with all .

With the defeat of the M23 rebels in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), this vast blighted country is poised for a brighter future.

(949) 457-9790. , and smuggling of Conflict Minerals to countries beyond the Covered Countries. There is both statistical and anecdotal evidence that the presence of precious commodities can prolong conflicts (a "resource curse"). Of the 12 suppliers, four were able to confirm the sources of the conflict minerals to be from "compliant smelters" with the remaining eight suppliers indicating that the status of some of the sources were unknown.

The regulation also draws on well-established rules to help stem the trade in conflict minerals. These so-called 'conflict minerals', such as tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold, can find their way into our mobile phones, cars and jewellery. according to the rmi rmap standard, the cahras shall include, at a minimum, countries identified as high-risk by relevant conflict minerals regulation, such as: the democratic republic of the congo (drc) and its nine adjoining countries as outlined in section 1502 of the dodd frank act, namely angola, burundi, central african republic, republic the conflict minerals rule requires heightened diligence and disclosure if, based on the registrant's reasonable country of origin inquiry, it knows that any of its necessary conflict minerals originated in a covered country and were not from recycled or scrap sources, or if it has reason to believe that any of its necessary conflict minerals may Abstract. The Conflict Minerals Rule is intended to reduce a significant source of funding for armed groups that are committing human rights abuses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (the "DRC") and its adjoining countries. "Conflict minerals" are defined in the Conflict Minerals Rule as cassiterite, columbite-tantalite Allegion policy

Does your company conduct conflict minerals survey(s) of your relevant . " Conflict Minerals " are defined in the Rule as gold, columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite and wolframite, including their derivatives, which are limited to tantalum, tin and tungsten. Exotica Valves is committed to purchase only those parts and products containing minerals that have been procured through a validated conflict-free supply chain, so as to avoid the use of minerals that have financed conflict in the covered countries, and we expect our suppliers to abide by the same standard. Most companies continued their due diligence measures and disclosures without much change. Our third-party consultant also applied quality assurance measures in . This means suppliers will be asked to complete a new CMRT every year in advance of the reporting deadline. The covered countries are: Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), The Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Tanzania, South Sudan, Burundi, Zambia, Rwanda, Angola and Uganda. . Provide, and expect our suppliers to cooperate in providing, due diligence information to confirm the tantalum, tin, tungsten and gold in our supply chain are conflict free. . about the source and supply chain of those Conflict Minerals. Do any of the smelters in your supply chain source the 3TG from the covered countries? CONFLICT MINERALS REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2020 . The Conflict Minerals Rule requires publicly traded companies to report annually the presence of conflict minerals (tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold, or "3TG") originating in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or adjoining countries ("Covered Countries"). Under Rule 13p-1, MTI is required to determine whether any conflict minerals are necessary to the functionality or production of a product it manufactures or contracts to manufacture and, if so . Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act aims to prevent the use of certain "Conflict Minerals" that, directly or indirectly, finance or benefit armed groups in The Democratic Republic of the Congo or adjoining countries (collectively, the "Covered Countries

It is estimated that the country contains between 65 .

Suppliers may contact the Supplier AlertLine at thdsupplieralertline.com or by using the following toll-free numbers: United States and Canada: 1-800-435-3152. If, after the inquiry, the company determines that its conflict minerals did not originate in the covered countries, the issuer must disclose that conclusion to the SEC . The rules and regulations require us to determine the extent to which our products contain Conflict Minerals originating from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and certain adjoining countries ("Covered Countries") by analyzing the products we manufacture and the raw materials and components we purchasethrough supply chain due . Provide, and expect our suppliers to cooperate in providing, due diligence information to confirm the tantalum, tin, tungsten and gold in our supply chain are conflict free. Most conflict mineral rules require companies to annually report on conflict minerals compliance. "Conflict minerals . On 17 May 2017, the EU Parliament and EU Council adopted new import regulation on 'Conflict Minerals' under Regulation 2017/821.Through the raw materials covered under the EU 'Conflict Minerals' Regulation, (tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold), companies importing the minerals used in producing mobile phones, technology, automotive products, as well as jewellery or . Federal law defines "conflict minerals" as (i) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore . Conflict minerals refer to tantalum, tungsten, tin, and gold originated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and its adjoining countries ("Covered Countries"). Microchip supports responsible minerals sourcing within the Covered Countries to encourage viable and ethical revenue streams for the local communities. The EU Conflict Minerals policy largely draws from Dodd-Frank 1502 but also shows more determination to promote transparent and sustainable trade with more high-risk areas included, not just the DRC and covered countries. conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries (the "covered countries") by mandating additional disclosure requirements on the use and source of "Conflict Minerals" whose exploitation and trade Congress believed are contributing to significant human rights abuses in the covered countries.

Lake Forest, CA 92630. Less than a . Part I: Introduction . Conflict Minerals Conflict Minerals Division for Counter Threat Finance and Sanctions The Office of Threat Finance Countermeasures, in conjunction with other State Department bureaus and U.S. agencies, actively works to sever the links between mineral resources and conflict through government-to-government diplomatic efforts. Forward-Looking Statements The EU regulation covers tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold because these are the four minerals that are most often linked to armed-conflicts and related human rights abuses, so it makes sense to focus on them. "Conflict Minerals" include gold, columbite-tantalite (col tan), cassiterite, and . To the extent that "conflict minerals" are necessary to the functionality or production of products that Next Computing manufactures or contracts to manufacture, we are required to conduct supply chain diligence to determine whether the conflict minerals originated in the DRC or one of the other "covered countries." "Conflict minerals . ("DRC") and adjoining countries ("Covered Countries") in the products they .